African Violet Propagation – The Pay Off

While propagation African violets is pretty easy to do, it takes time for the leaf cutting to root and grow plantlets. It takes more time for the plantlets to establish themselves and grow. And only when they’ve reached maturity will the plants start to bloom. Considering the fact that it takes 7-10 months for this entire process to occur, propagating African violets has to be seen as a labor of love and an exercise in patience!

The leaves that I put in potting soil back in the spring have finally completed this process. I’m growing five different varieties that I purchased from Lydon Lyon. What has surprised me is how different the grow habits of each of the violets are. These differences just seem to be part of the genetic make up of the plants.

My favorite of the group is “No Regrets.” The flowers are large and the same plant can have different combinations of pink and white. These are also the best looking plants of the group.

No Regrets

No Regrets

 

No Regrets

No Regrets

“Circus Fascination” is another violet that’s a keeper. The plants have dark green leaves and the flowers are an interesting color with different marking on each one. I also like the frilled edges of the flowers.

Circus Fascination

Circus Fascination

The one semi-miniature plant that I’m growing is “Blueberry Sprite.” I’m warming up to this plant as time goes on. The leaves tend to cup down over the pot and the individual blooms aren’t that interesting. However, the flowers are long-lasting and put on a nice show en masse.

Blueberry Sprite

Blueberry Sprite

I’m on the fence with last two varieties. “Solemn Promise” has very pale leaves and appears to be sensitive to over fertilization. The picture on the website was much nicer than what I’m seeing on this plant.

Solemn Promise

Solemn Promise

“Spectacular” has yet to live up to its name. So far, it’s just bizarre! The plants are just getting ready to bloom but each one is filled with suckers and all twisted up. If the blooms impress me, I might try to keep this variety going; otherwise it’s into the garbage to make room for other plants!

Whenever you’re working with any kind of plant, you never know for sure what you’re going to get until you grow it yourself. I’m surprised by how differently each of these violets grow. My labor of love has paid off with at least three violets that I’ll be keeping. 60% pay off? Not too bad in my book!

 

 

 

 

 

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